Monday, November 27, 2017

Three Rivers Petroglyphs

Here in southern New Mexico, we're never far from scenes like this one at Three Rivers. The photos can't really convey the immense stillness and silence and isolation. No one is nearby. No one.



Long ago there was a village here, inhabited by the Jornada Mogollon people between 900 and 1400 AD.

Take the trail up the hill and look at their art work, painstakingly picked onto the rocks using stone tools. More than 21,000 glyphs have been found here, showing "birds, humans, animals, fish, insects and plants, as well as numerous geometric and abstract designs are scattered over 50 acres of New Mexico's northern Chihuahuan Desert." (New Mexico True: The Three Rivers Petroglyph Site).



A petroglyph—derived from the words “petro,” or “rock,” and “glyph,” to “carve,” or “carving”—is essentially just that, a rock carving. (Whispers of the Past Engraved in New Mexico Petroglyphs).




Looking back down the hill you can see the site of the village where the ancient rock artists lived. You can almost imagine the busy sounds of their neighborhood breaking through the vast silences we experience today.



Saturday, October 14, 2017

CATastrophe Averted

Deep into family history research last night, I was only dimly aware of thumping sounds from the other room. When I finally surfaced from the 18th century, I found Henry the kitten tearing around the living room wrapped in yarn and dragging my almost fully knit sweater behind him. It was an exciting and stimulating discovery for me, and quite an embarrassment for Henry.
All is well once again. Henry was extricated from behind the sofa and the yarn unwound from his back foot. The sweater was fished out from behind the TV, somewhat dusty but miraculously still on the needles. My skein of yarn will never look the same. The knitting bag was locked in the closet for the night and tired little Henry went to sleep with a dreamy little smile on his face.

No photos were taken during all the excitement, but here is the untangling process well underway this morning. 



A colorful project unharmed and just a few more inches to go.
Note: Also makes a good dust cloth. 

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Hello, Henry!


This is how we feed them here at the Zee house. Please welcome young Henry (aka Hank, aka Handkerchief), shown here eating on the lower deck. He is an older kitten rescue from the local shelter. 

From the ASPCA Pet Statistics page: Each year, approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized (670,000 dogs and 860,000 cats). The number of dogs and cats euthanized in U.S. shelters annually has declined from approximately 2.6 million in 2011. This decline can be partially explained by an increase in the percentage of animals adopted and an increase in the number of stray animals successfully returned to their owners.

Our local shelter has worked hard to lower the rate of euthanization and to place their homeless animals into caring homes. They bring dogs available for adoption to many community events, and they have satellite operations around town where cats can be seen up close. It's much more relaxing to look at just a few cats in cages at a pet food store or, in our case, the "Kitty Condo" at our county building, than to go to the shelter. Visiting the shelter is an overwhelmingly emotional experience for me--so many animals, such great need!

Bill became acquainted with Henry because he (Bill, not Henry) attends a lot of meetings at the County Building and stopped by the Kitty Condo each time to visit a little kitten called Jupiter (now Henry). Once they were bonded, there was little I could do. Now we are a much livelier household!

Plus, we get to live another 18-22 years, the possible life expectancy for a cat. I'm absolutely sure it works that way.